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CAP OF MONOMACH OF THE SECOND ORDER:
CROWN OF PETER THE GREAT

MOSCOW, KREMLIN WORKSHOPS, 1682
Gold, silver, precious stones, cloth, sable
Height: 20.3 Centimeters

The title of the crown stems from an episode at the end of the 17th century. After Czar Feodor Alexeevich died in April 1682, the throne should have passed to his brother, the 14-year-old Ivan Alexeevich. The Czarevich, however, was mentally incompetent and the Boyars' Duma therefore proclaimed Peter Alexeevich Czar at the age of 10.

Peter Alexeevich was the younger brother of Feodor and Ivan. Ivan, however, had the support of the armed forces and one of the most powerful groups of nobles: They decided that both brothers should be crowned together, and forced the Boyars' Duma to declare Ivan Czar alongside Peter. At the coronation of the Czareviches, the ancient Cap of Monomach was placed on the head of the elder Ivan and a Cap of Monomach of the Second Order was specially made for the younger Peter.

The craftsmen who made this second crown closely recreated the original. The form of both the new and the old crowns is reminiscent of Eastern headgear. Both are made of eight gold plates and are topped with a hemispherical knob with a cross. Like all Russian royal crowns, they are trimmed with sable, a fur with an ancient ritual significance and a symbol of prosperity and wealth.

Text taken from catalog description by Irina A. Bobrovnitskaya


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